word of the day: leap

Close your eyes and step out over the edge. Leave behind the baggage that will weigh you down. Stretch farther than you believed you could. Gather your courage; you’ll need it. Let go of every one of those twenty-seven reasons why you can’t do it. Drop the concepts of failure, of success. Just do it. Know that you’ll fly or you won’t. The ground isn’t that far away – and if you create a safety net before you go, someone will somehow break your fall. Maybe falling is okay. You’re not jumping off Mt. Kilimanjaro; you’re simply testing your reach, bridging what seemed to be an impossible chasm. Sell off your furniture and take a trip. Cut up your credit cards. Become houseless for a while. Ask for help with the children while you write or train or sing or sleep. Ask again. Move far away. Leap.

The text is excerpted from Words of Wisdom for Women (Barnes & Noble 2003) by Rachel Snyder; also available under original title, 365 Words of Well-Being for Women (McGraw-Hill 1997) by same. Link to Barnes & Noble.com in sidebar at right.

Here is a beautiful, soulful video (6:07 min.) accompanying the song Glosoli (Glowing Sun) by Sigur Ros, an Icelandic self-identified “slow-motion rock” band. (Sorry for not getting the accent marks placed!) The ending is unexpectedly glorious. If you can’t see the video below, go directly to youtube.

3 comments

  1. While leaping and abandoning everything does conjure up feelings of excitement…I think I will pass on becoming “houseless” for awhile. :) Do people actually do that? My whole family would file a missing person report. *laughs*

    Athena

    Like

  2. rachel

    Christian,

    Love your anagrammatizations!

    Athena,

    Of course, everyone’s idea of what it means to “leap” is different. For some people, a huge leap could be as simple as speaking a bit of truth that has been lodged in your throat for years! Or, taking a different route to work one day. I actually have gone “home-free” for periods at a time (sometimes intentionally, sometimes not). It pushes my comfort zone, widens my vulnerability, shakes up my usual rhythm, and I end up connecting with friends new and old by spending quality time under their roofs for a piece. I have enough of the “gypsy gene” that it usually ends up being an expansive and horizon-widening experience. Admittedly, not for everyone at every stage of life…

    Like

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